smalldeedsdunn

an ode to black girls with mud in their blood.

Falling in love with Carolyn Malachi.

Falling in love with Carolyn Malachi.

gomdoria:

이 음반 대박.

Carolyn Malachi - Beautiful Dreamer <Gold, 2013>

✨✨✨✨

justwantobehere:

intheindigo:

b1a4gasms:

la-lobalita:

kentstatecult:

most of my Saturday was spent looking up stuff about Bina48.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BINA48BINA48 is a project of Terasem Movement, Incorporated (TMI)[5] and is designed to test whether a person’s consciousness can be downloaded into a non-biological or nanotechnological body after combining detailed data about a person through the use of future consciousness software

A lesbian of color (who is married to a trans woman) becomes the model for an ultra advanced AI system.This is huge.Other links…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4KHuQYm_z4https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaDB4HmV8ykhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvcQCJpZJH8

so lemme get this… the developer/ceo of the development company is a jewish trans lesbian woman and the highest paid female ceo in america, and this project is based on her wife, a black lesbian woman, and both are mothers with children from previous relationships who they have now each legally adopted???
this exists in the actual world and  people still think sci fi can only be about straight cis vaguely-christian white men…….

fishnbanjos justwantobehere
thank you&#160;!!!

justwantobehere:

intheindigo:

b1a4gasms:

la-lobalita:

kentstatecult:

most of my Saturday was spent looking up stuff about Bina48.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BINA48
BINA48 is a project of Terasem Movement, Incorporated (TMI)[5] and is designed to test whether a person’s consciousness can be downloaded into a non-biological or nanotechnological body after combining detailed data about a person through the use of future consciousness software

A lesbian of color (who is married to a trans woman) becomes the model for an ultra advanced AI system.
This is huge.

Other links…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4KHuQYm_z4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XaDB4HmV8yk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvcQCJpZJH8

so lemme get this… the developer/ceo of the development company is a jewish trans lesbian woman and the highest paid female ceo in america, and this project is based on her wife, a black lesbian woman, and both are mothers with children from previous relationships who they have now each legally adopted???

this exists in the actual world and  people still think sci fi can only be about straight cis vaguely-christian white men…….

fishnbanjos justwantobehere

thank you !!!

lamus-dworski:

Poles in Haiti - Polish legions in the Haitian war of independence (1802-1803)

Located in the Department of Grande Anse and not too far from the Haitian Capital, Port-au-Prince, Cazale (also spelled Cazales/Casale) is a small village in Haiti. It is mainly agricultural. One thing distinctly unique about Cazale is its large Polish influence.

In 1802, the Napoleon army who came to Santo Domingo to fight the slave rebellion, included a Polish legion. There were about 5200 Poles sent to Saint Domingue by Napoleon. The Polish officers were told that there was a revolt in Saint-Domingue; however, upon arrival, the Polish brigade realized that the rebellion that they were informed of by the Napoleon army was actually slaves in the Colony fighting for their freedom.

At that time, there was a similar war going on in Poland. these polish soldiers were fighting back home for the liberation of their own country. In 1772, 1793 and 1795 Russia, Prussia (Germany) and Austria were subsequently invading Poland, resulting in the infamous Partitions of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, when it disappeared from the maps. Many Poles, hopeful of uniting in some way to win back Polish territory, made alliance with France and joined Napoleon’s army, but as distinct Polish units.

Many Polish soldiers decided to leave the French army and join the slave rebellion. They all settled in Casale, La Vallee de Jacmel, Fond des Blancs, La Baleine, Port Salut and St. Jean du Sud. Several Polish soldiers participated in the Haitian revolution of 1804 [read more: the disastrous Haitian campaign]. The Polish soldiers acquired Haitian citizenship after Haiti’s Independence, settled there to never return home. Even today, you can find Haitian Poles, blue eyed, blond, with European features.

Now turning the page into the Duvalier era. Casale became a stronghold for communism and many young intellectuals in the region were in direct conflict with François Duvalier's regime. as a consequence, March 29, 1969 came to be known as the worst day for the people of Casale. With the help of his Tonton Macoute [private army], Duvalier built a barricade around Casale, and murdered many young guys.

Pope John Paul II who visited Haiti in 1983, mentioned the Polish contribution to the Slave rebellion leading to Haiti’s independence. Several Haitian Poles from Cazale, La Vallée-de-Jacmel, Fond-des-Blancs, La Baleine, Port Salut and Saint-Jean-du-Sud were selected by the Duvalier regime to attend the various ceremonies organized for the Pope visit." [text source]

On pictures:

  1. January Suchodolski (1797-1875): “Battle at San Domingo”, 1845. [source]
  2. Visit of the Pope John Paul II in Port-au-Prince, March 1983. Descendants of the Polish soldiers holding an image of the Our Lady of Częstochowa (also called the Black Madonna of Częstochowa), one the holiest paintings of Polish Catholic Church. [source]
  3. Inhabitants of the “Polish village” in Haiti; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  4. One of typical houses in Cazale, Haiti - resembling Polish rural architecture in form; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  5. Inhabitants of the “Polish village” in Haiti; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  6. Joseph Merlo Delice and his cousin, Michel Delice are playing dominoes with a visitor from Poland. One of the few pastimes available in this mountain village; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  7. One of houses in Cazale; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]
  8. Mme Exavier Rosandre. Cazale village; photographed by Światosław Wojtkowiak. [source]

To watch // Do obejrzenia:

// Fundacja Polska-Haiti

haitianhistory:

West Indian Paintings by Agostino Brunias (1730-1796) (Source)

While these paintings do not necessarily deal directly with colonial Saint-Domingue, they are still fascinating in view of the fact that they represent “typical” West Indian and Caribbean reality as understood by artists such as Agostino Brunias. Brunias travelled to various English West Indian colonies including Dominica and St. Vincent. His work is very interesting and clearly makes a (rather romanticized) commentary on the “racial” diversity of the Caribbean, which was of great curiosity for Europeans at that time.

It appears his work outlived him even in the eighteenth century, since even Saint-Domingue’s Toussaint Louverture was said to have been wearing reproductions of his paintings in his waistcoat buttons.

haitianhistory:

Artwork: Mujer criolla y criadas by Agostino Brunias (Source) 
Racial and Social Classes in colonial Saint-Domingue (Haiti)
I. Whites - Grands Blancs 
The Grands Blancs were: usually wealthy whites; born in Europe or of direct European ancestry; owned most of the land, plantations and slaves in the colony; had the greatest access to political power in the domestic affairs of Saint-Domingue; usually did as they pleased in the colony; numbered around 30, 826 (with the Petits Blancs) by the outbreak of the French Revolution (1789)
Whites - Petit Blancs 
The Petits Blancs were: typically poor (or poorer) whites; usually owned neither land nor slaves; little real political power; occupy secondary functions in the colony (usually as overseers, innkeepers, sailors or soldiers); many were former indentured servants; felt much antagonism towards most of the population; could not make full alliance with the Grands Blancs despite color (usually because considered too poor); could not make any alliance with the free coloreds because too racist and jealous of the success of the latter; want to become Grands Blancs but often experience a lot of difficulty; still many did better than some free coloreds; numbered around 30, 826 (with the Grands Blancs) by the 1789.
II. Free Coloreds - Gens de Couleur Libres &amp; Affranchis 
The Gens de Couleur Libres and Affranchis were: ** not all mulattoes or quadroons; some born free, others into slavery; a very complex group; sometimes mixed-race (usually the product of an union between white French men and (more often then not) enslaved Black women, as the case with André Rigaud); sometimes Black (like Toussaint Louverture, who had purchased his freedom and became an Affranchi); many were educated in France; some became considerably wealthy and owned plantations and slaves; rarely treated those slaves with more regards then their white counterparts (because of the established system and desire to keep social distinction alive); not considered equal to whites and often experienced humiliation and discrimination; most important characteristic was that they were “people of color” who were not slaves; many of those who remained in Haiti after the Revolution became part of the emerging elite; numbered around 27, 548 by 1789.
III. Slaves 
The slaves were: essentially considered property; regardless of the Code Noir of 1685, had little real legal protection in practice; enjoyed almost no control over their lives, bodies, labour, sexuality or offspring; separated by the rest of the population by law; number of slaves in island increased considerably every year, not by normal reproductive activity, but due to significant importation of new slaves; experienced different lives if were house slaves, plantation slaves or urban domestic slaves; life expectancy varied with type of labour; plantation slaves usually estimated to live around 10 years after arrival to Saint-Domingue (some scholars argue less); many ran away to escape conditions and formed maroon communities, if only for few months; numbered around 465, 429 by 1789.
Few Observations 
Overall, while Saint-Domingue was a “typical” slave island for the 18th century, a few observations could be made. First, due to the vast import of African slaves each year to the island, whites were easily outnumbered by a ratio of about 15 to 1. This did not appear particularly alarming to most as they believed the slaves would never “even think” of rebelling and were overall passive creatures, incapable of intellectual or physical desire for freedom. 
Another interesting feature of Saint-Domingue is that it possessed one of the fasting growing Gens de Couleur Libres (free people of color/free coloreds) populations. Many of those individuals enjoyed European education and wealth, therefore competed directly with the white population by challenging typical racial and social hierarchies. Increasingly by 1769, Saint-Domingue’s local administrators attempted to limit the social mobility of the Gens de Couleur Libres by excluding them from occupying certain functions in the colony. Racial and color lines were becoming much more rigid than they had before, so much so that there were fewer nuptials between wealthy Gens de Couleur Libres and aspiring white families (a practice that had been fairly common only decades earlier). Moreover, various laws were passed around the same time to segregate whites from free coloreds in churches, theatres, dance halls and other public areas. Despite growing antagonism from the white population - as an increasingly important planter and slave-owning class - most of the free coloreds did not initially think of an alliance with the slave population. 
All in all, by the eve of the French Revolution, which drastically influenced the outbreak and earlier episodes of the Haitian Revolution, the social climate in Saint-Domingue was already tense. 
[ Source, Source, Source, Source, Source &amp; Source ]

haitianhistory:

Artwork: Mujer criolla y criadas by Agostino Brunias (Source)

Racial and Social Classes in colonial Saint-Domingue (Haiti)

I. Whites - Grands Blancs 

The Grands Blancs were: usually wealthy whites; born in Europe or of direct European ancestry; owned most of the land, plantations and slaves in the colony; had the greatest access to political power in the domestic affairs of Saint-Domingue; usually did as they pleased in the colony; numbered around 30, 826 (with the Petits Blancs) by the outbreak of the French Revolution (1789)

Whites - Petit Blancs

The Petits Blancs were: typically poor (or poorer) whites; usually owned neither land nor slaves; little real political power; occupy secondary functions in the colony (usually as overseers, innkeepers, sailors or soldiers); many were former indentured servants; felt much antagonism towards most of the population; could not make full alliance with the Grands Blancs despite color (usually because considered too poor); could not make any alliance with the free coloreds because too racist and jealous of the success of the latter; want to become Grands Blancs but often experience a lot of difficulty; still many did better than some free coloreds; numbered around 30, 826 (with the Grands Blancs) by the 1789.

II. Free Coloreds - Gens de Couleur Libres & Affranchis

The Gens de Couleur Libres and Affranchis were: ** not all mulattoes or quadroons; some born free, others into slavery; a very complex group; sometimes mixed-race (usually the product of an union between white French men and (more often then not) enslaved Black women, as the case with André Rigaud); sometimes Black (like Toussaint Louverture, who had purchased his freedom and became an Affranchi); many were educated in France; some became considerably wealthy and owned plantations and slaves; rarely treated those slaves with more regards then their white counterparts (because of the established system and desire to keep social distinction alive); not considered equal to whites and often experienced humiliation and discrimination; most important characteristic was that they were “people of color” who were not slaves; many of those who remained in Haiti after the Revolution became part of the emerging elite; numbered around 27, 548 by 1789.

III. Slaves

The slaves were: essentially considered property; regardless of the Code Noir of 1685, had little real legal protection in practice; enjoyed almost no control over their lives, bodies, labour, sexuality or offspring; separated by the rest of the population by law; number of slaves in island increased considerably every year, not by normal reproductive activity, but due to significant importation of new slaves; experienced different lives if were house slaves, plantation slaves or urban domestic slaves; life expectancy varied with type of labour; plantation slaves usually estimated to live around 10 years after arrival to Saint-Domingue (some scholars argue less); many ran away to escape conditions and formed maroon communities, if only for few months; numbered around 465, 429 by 1789.

Few Observations

Overall, while Saint-Domingue was a “typical” slave island for the 18th century, a few observations could be made. First, due to the vast import of African slaves each year to the island, whites were easily outnumbered by a ratio of about 15 to 1. This did not appear particularly alarming to most as they believed the slaves would never “even think” of rebelling and were overall passive creatures, incapable of intellectual or physical desire for freedom.

Another interesting feature of Saint-Domingue is that it possessed one of the fasting growing Gens de Couleur Libres (free people of color/free coloreds) populations. Many of those individuals enjoyed European education and wealth, therefore competed directly with the white population by challenging typical racial and social hierarchies. Increasingly by 1769, Saint-Domingue’s local administrators attempted to limit the social mobility of the Gens de Couleur Libres by excluding them from occupying certain functions in the colony. Racial and color lines were becoming much more rigid than they had before, so much so that there were fewer nuptials between wealthy Gens de Couleur Libres and aspiring white families (a practice that had been fairly common only decades earlier). Moreover, various laws were passed around the same time to segregate whites from free coloreds in churches, theatres, dance halls and other public areas. Despite growing antagonism from the white population - as an increasingly important planter and slave-owning class - most of the free coloreds did not initially think of an alliance with the slave population.

All in all, by the eve of the French Revolution, which drastically influenced the outbreak and earlier episodes of the Haitian Revolution, the social climate in Saint-Domingue was already tense.

[ SourceSource, Source, Source, Source & Source ]

“‘Q.U.E.E.N.’ definitely is an acronym,” Monae explains during an interview at Fuse HQ. “It’s for those who are marginalized.” She says the “Q” represents the queer community, the “U” for the untouchables, the “E” for emigrants, the second “E” for the excommunicated and the “N” for those labeled as negroid.

"It’s for everyone who’s felt ostracized," she adds. "I wanted to create something for people who feel like they want to give up because they’re not accepted by society."

“Critics generally don’t associate Black people with ideas. They see marginal people; they see just another story about Black folks. They regard the whole thing as sociologically interesting perhaps, but very parochial. There’s a notion out in the land that there are human beings one writes about, and then there are Black people or Indians or some other marginal group. If you write about the world from that point of view, somehow it is considered lesser. We are people, not aliens. We live, we love, and we die.”

— Toni Morrison (via blackcontemporaryart)
black girl rituals, 2014

black girl rituals, 2014